In the Rose Garden

Meetings for Sufi meditation, mentoring and healing

“…the sun is always in its sphere. Yet, if a blind man cannot feel or perceive the sun’s attitude, his lack of sensation does not mean that the sun does not exist or that it is standing still in its place. If the blind man’s handicap is removed, he has no right to chide the sun for not existing in the world prior to that or for not shining on him before, because it was always constant in its motion. The change will have been his, not the sun’s.”
Shaikh al-Maqtul Shahab ad-Din Yahya ibn Habash Surhawardi

This is what spirituality is all about: opening our eyes to see what is, removing the “handicap” we have grown to be so accustomed to almost from the start of this life. And how does that happen, how come we don’t naturally shake off the fog of the illusion but instead remain trapped within a knockoff of the life we could have been living?

The reasons are, literally, close to the body. Our perception is the key. It is the way we get used to use our senses, and the misplaced and mismanaged activity of our mind that we call thinking, that are the culprits. Through our senses we learn to perceive the world as an assortment of unconnected things and processes, and ourselves as separate from each other and from the world that we see, hear, touch, which is the reality we trust to exist. Not just our brain, but our mind quickly gets habituated and begins supporting this indigent worldview.

And straight after birth we begin trying to find fulfilment, peace and love in the outside world, but never feel like we have found enough, that we are living fully enough, or that we are being loved enough. And this condition of ours is absolutely no surprise: the “outside world” is that of perpetual change, so how can we find anything at all in it that endures the tides of time?

And yet, we keep looking in the wrong place – simply because everyone else does, and so we do, too. At some point, we agree to such a life; we give up hope that there could be something altogether different, something dramatically better.

We might even read lots of books on spirituality, yet we don’t feel that we ourselves will ever be able to reach that enduring state of expanded consciousness, that incredible aliveness that they tell us about. We begin thinking that the spiritual awakening, enlightenment, is somewhere “out there,” “far away” and that it is for some special people… and we are simply not that.

And that is not true.

As you are reading this, you are, very likely, a human. And if you are, guess what that means? We all have a place inside – well, not really a place, but let’s imagine it is, as it is just easier that way – a place of  profound stillness. So vast, so deep… like an ocean, only unmoving. Always present, we can’t make it disappear. We can only learn not to notice. The good news is that we can also unlearn.

Is it easy to get in touch with it? Well, it is, if you just want to come with a visit. It will require some time and effort to settle in there. The main thing though is that it is definitely possible.

That “place” is not the “final goal” (not that there is such a thing… despite what we all tend to think) but remembering it could become a beginning of a very different life.

My name is Natalia Nur Jahan. I am a meditation teacher, a spiritual mentor and a counsellor.

It has always been a great happiness for me to be able to support someone in achieving a greater degree of freedom in their life. What freedom is differs for each of us: to be free really means to find our own way, our deepest purpose, our most direct and joyous path through this plane of existence. It has to do with becoming who and what we came into this life to become, to be.

I began working as a transpersonal psychotherapy practitioner and then also as a life-coach in the 90s. Later the life-coaching quite naturally turned into the Sufi life-coaching, and my work with the “inner parts,” while remaining mostly within the stream of the Holodynamics, has also got an added dimension of what is known as “Sufi SoulWork.”

At the same time, my main focus now, as well as my utmost delight, is on helping others to develop a steady habit of meditation, to hone the ability to touch the calm vastness of one’s heart, and to gradually learn to have all of one’s feelings, thoughts, and actions be grounded in that place of the all-including, unbiased peace, in the unfathomable depth and richness of Life.

In the Rose Garden